On Seeking God’s Help…

A prayer of participating in God’s redemptive work…He’s not a puppet master that pulls strings.  He has created us to be coworkers, co-creators, co-participants.  That means we do His work WITH him.

“If I am actually to do it, I must ask for your help
and mercy, ask you to fill with wind the sails
I have hoisted for you and to carry me
forward on my course—to breath, that is,
your Spirit into my faith . . . and to enable me
to continue . . .”
(Hilary of Poitiers, 4th c.)

The Complementarity of Man and Woman: An International Colloquium

Videos and talks about the crisis of family and marriage from the wide landscape of Christian faith as hosted by Pope Francis.

http://humanum.it/en/

The Complementarity of Man and Woman: An International Colloquium is a gathering of leaders and scholars from many religions across the globe, to examine and propose anew the beauty of the relationship between the man and the woman, in order to support and reinvigorate marriage and family life for the flourishing of human society.

Witnesses will draw from
 the wisdom of their religious tradition and cultural experience as they attest to the power and vitality of the complementary union of man and woman. It is hoped that the colloquium be a catalyst for creative language and projects, as well as for global solidarity, in the work
 of strengthening the nuptial relationship, both for the good of the spouses themselves and for the good of all who depend upon them.

The Colloquium is sponsored by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and co-sponsored by the Pontifical Council for the Family, the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, and
 the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of Christian Unity.

Rethinking Kingdom, Church, and Mission: Scot Mcknight Interview

This has been marinating in my head for some time now.  It’s a call to return to loving the Bride that Christ.  Kingdom work is done in and through the Church.  It spills it out into the public sector.  We need a place to be equipped, empowered, and encouraged.  The Local Church is where we practice the virtues of faith, hope, and charity.  Where else can be trained to be agents of God’s Kingdom?  We need to be with others who are spurring us towards good works.  We need the local church and we need to see it as God’s place of rule and reign.

Source:  http://goo.gl/gVkGGq

Kingdom mission is now defined for us by the word kingdom: it means living under king Jesus with other king Jesus people who also follow king Jesus’ will in king Jesus’ space. (Save that issue of land and space for some other time, as it is not a crucial element to my book.)

God’s mission is the church, that is, God’s mission is the Body of Christ, that is, God’s mission is to rule in Christ over those who submit to Christ’s rule. Those who submit to that rule are kingdom people, that is, church people. God’s mission is the church.

- Scot Mcknight (Jesus Creed Blog)

Tips on firing a toxic employee

Every company will have to deal with a bad “hire”.  Here’s a way to remove the toxic person from the company.  Toxic employees cause toxic company culture.

source:  http://www.cbsnews.com/news/how-to-fire-a-toxic-employee/

1. Make sure there are two people in the room when you have this discussion. The door should be shut for privacy, but under no circumstances should this discussion happen one on one. One person can remain completely silent, but you need a witness.

2. Explain, explicitly what the problem is. You can’t say “You’re mean and no one likes you.” You can says

You cut people off mid-sentence
You told Karen she was ugly.
You yelled at Steve in a meeting in front of a client
etc, etc, etc.
3. Has she been told any of this before? I don’t think so, from your letter, so she will be SHOCKED and she will DENY that she has done any of that. She will speak about her accomplishments.

4. Acknowledge her accomplishments, but state clearly that this is about her attitude.

5. Don’t get defensive. It’s very easy to get caught up in defending yourself. You don’t need to do this. You can restate the problems and reiterate that this behavior needs to change.

6. Present her with written documentation of what she

has done wrong
needs to do differently
how this will be monitored
what the consequences will be if she doesn’t fix the problem
7. If she makes improvements, be prepared to acknowledge them. You need to be sure that if you are giving her 30 days to improve and she does improve that you don’t fire her. That’s a lawsuit waiting to happen.
8. If she doesn’t make improvements, terminate her on day 30. Don’t wait until day 32 because someone is out of town. Don’t put it off a week to give her one more chance. Day 30 is her last day of work.

9. Terminate her in a straight forward fashion. Here is a sample dialogue:

Mary, as you know, you have been on a 30 day probation. The terms of this are spelled out here: [present documentation]. As we have discussed, you have not met requirements 1, 3, 4, 5, and 8. Therefore today is your last day of work. Would you like assistance packing up your things?
10. Don’t hover unless you feel that she will cause real problems. How you treat someone when you fire them is extremely important to the financial health of your organization.
11. After she’s gone, tell everyone that she is gone. Don’t let people guess. You don’t need to tell them she was fired–that part is obvious. Again, sample dialogue:

Today was Mary’s last day of work. We appreciate the work she did for us and wish her well in her new endeavors. We’re going to begin the process of hiring someone new to take her place. In the mean time, we hope everyone can pitch in to cover her old responsibilities.

Leading Up in the Workplace

Not the Owner or the CEO?  That’s okay.  You still have influence.  Here’s a way to “lead up”.  I hear a lot of employees saying they wish things were “done different”.  Here’s a way to influence that difference.  It’s not a quick and easy answer but there are some practical ways to influence.

Source:  http://www.cnn.com/2009/BUSINESS/11/10/manage.your.boss/

1. Understand your boss
Ask yourself, what makes your boss tick at work? Is it control and predictability, or exciting ideas and new initiatives?
“First, you have to understand what’s important to your boss, what they care about, and what they wake up in the night worrying about,” said Cohen.
But you don’t have to go foraging through your boss’s trash to find clues to their psychological makeup. What your boss says and does will tell you all you need to know.
“Pay attention to the person you work for, because that person is telling you an awful lot about how to work with them,” Edwards told CNN.

2. Lead from the middle
You many not be the boss, but that doesn’t mean you can’t think like one.
John Baldoni is a leadership development consultant and author of “Lead your Boss: The Subtle Art of Managing Up.” He told CNN he prefers the term “leading up” to managing up.
“Leading up means adopting the perspective of a CEO with the authority of a middle manager,” said Baldoni.
“Look for opportunities to effect positive change, grow the business, or get more out of the team. Think holistically about how your actions as a middle manager can affect the whole organization.”

3. Build credibility
You won’t be able to influence your manager unless you are credible, and the way to build credibility is by being good at your job, says Cohen.
Baldoni told CNN, “If you are someone who can get things done and your colleagues and bosses trust you, they will know you are a positive influence and they will come to you.”

4. It’s not about you
Managing up may be good for your career, but it’s not about brown nosing — it’s about doing what’s right for your organization.
“Some people think managing up is sucking up, but it’s not,” Edwards told CNN. “Yes, it ends up having a tremendous impact on your own PR, but you have to put other people first, and that’s something a lot of people don’t understand.”
Cohen agrees. “People listen more to what you’re saying if they think you actually care about them and are interested in their general welfare,” he said.

5. Take action
It’s not enough to just turn up for work and wait for your manager to lead. You need to be proactive in your relationship towards your manager, and your organization as a whole.
“Act upon what it is that needs to be done,” said Baldoni. “Initiate a new program, take a lead in product development, perhaps the reorganization of a business.
“Be front and center on an issue that will benefit not simply yourself, but the whole organization.”

6. Dealing with a difficult boss
Edwards says that dealing with a difficult boss is sometimes just a matter of communicating in a way they understand. Technical people respond to hard data, creative types prefer hearing about big ideas. But some bosses just won’t respond to leadership from below.